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Experts / October 2018
Sarah Corda, Global Newsroom

Where Do Trainers Look For Inspiration? We Asked, They Answered!

There are 59 million posts on Instagram that include #fitspo. And while it’s clear we look to social media as a place for our fitness inspiration, for many of us, the individuals who most inspire us to lead healthy lives are the ones standing directly in front of us in class: our trainers.  

But, where do these trainers look for their inspiration? And what inspired them to pursue this career in the first place?

We asked three of New York City’s most popular trainers these questions and more when gathered with them recently for an event to celebrate the launch of Reebok’s new PureMove Bra—the first-ever sports bra treated with Motion Sense technology.

Katia Pryce  is the Founder and an instructor at DanceBody, Reese Scott is the Founder and a trainer at Women’s World of Boxing and Alex Sharry is an instructor at Sky Ting Yoga.

“I was a professional dancer all my life and I wanted to find a workout that would not only keep me strong but keep the aesthetic of a dancer that I really loved,” says Pryce on what led her to start DanceBody five years ago.

“I created DanceBody frankly out of a selfish want of a workout that would really fit my body the best, and as I found out, other people wanted the same thing.”  

While not an owner of Sky Ting, Sharry has been an instructor since the studio opened; like Pryce, she notes that Sky Ting also seemed to fill a void people were finding in their yoga practices.

“The approach in opening it was really wanting to create a community where they weren't telling the teachers how to do their jobs. The owners really entrusted us to bring ourselves to it. We did that and people came back.”   

The owners really entrusted us to bring ourselves to it. We did that and people came back.

Scott opened Women’s World of Boxing with a similar vision. She loved to box but saw how traditional boxing gyms could feel unwelcoming to women. With that top of mind, she set out to create a gym specifically for women—a place where they could feel welcome and comfortable as they were.

“It's a very intimidating sport. It is known to be a male-dominated sport. Women know it to be a guys' thing, but that’s not the case.”

But teaching class after class, day after day can be a grind. It’s a grind these women know well—they’re living it. So, what keeps them coming back?

“I find motivation in all of the women that I train, because they're all so different,” adds Scott. “They all have their thing, and when they share their stories with me, they inspire me to do more.”  

“To be able to see them transform and redefine and rediscover and find their strength through this sport has been amazing. That's the best of what I do.”

I find motivation in all of the women that I train, because they're all so different.

Pryce resonates with this, noting she too draws inspiration from the women who take her classes.

“My hope is that I can create a place where women can just be, and it's not crunchy granola, where we’re all going to hold hands. No, we're badasses. We're warriors. We go to work, we do what we need to do, and then for an hour every day, we get to dance and we feel good about our bodies and feel good about ourselves.”

My hope is that I can create a place where women can just be, and it's not crunchy granola, where we’re all going to hold hands. No, we're badasses.

And then there are the women they’ve yet to teach.

“There are so many women who are walking around with their natural stored ability, but they don't even know that they have it,” says Scott.  She’s ready for the day these women enter her gym, or any gym where they can make an emotional connection, for that matter.

Sharry says seeing people choose to spend extra time at the studio – knowing what a community and safe space they’ve created at Sky Ting – is something that reminds her why she wanted teach in the first place.

“There's people just who hang out at Sky Ting all day,” she says. “Students will just bring their laptops and sit around and hang out all day. To create an environment like that, where people just want be there all the time, this really is something amazing.”

There are so many women who are walking around with their natural stored ability, but they don't even know that they have it.

Sharry also mentions the support she feels, both from her studio owners and those who attend her classes. She believes finding a job where you feel genuinely supported is something that should not be taken for granted.

According to Scott, this feeling of support is only growing. She hopes all hardworking women out there view it as a motivator.

“I feel now more than ever that women are so supportive of other women. I feel like finally we're all on the same team, and we're not competing against one another. It’s just awesome."

I feel like finally we're all on the same team, and we're not competing against one another.

Shop the Reebok PureMove Bra.

Experts / October 2018
Sarah Corda, Global Newsroom