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CrossFit® / July 2018
Sarah Corda, Global Newsroom

Katrin Davisdottir on Finding Confidence, Self-Acceptance on the Competition Floor

For Katrin Davisdottir, competing in the CrossFit Games is her “favorite feeling in the world.”

Only 25 years old, Davidsdottir has already won the Games twice, claiming the title of Fittest Woman on Earth in both 2015 and 2016.

But make no mistake, the Icelandic native is nowhere near finished. In a matter of days, she’ll be competing in the 2018 Reebok CrossFit Games where she is looking to become the first woman to ever win the Games for a third time.   

“I want to be better than myself,” says Davidsdottir. “I want to be better today than I was yesterday. And tomorrow, I want to be a better version of myself than I am right now.”

I want to be better today than I was yesterday. And tomorrow, I want to be a better version of myself than I am right now.

Davidsdottir is a part of Reebok’s new Be More Human campaign, which shines a light on women who are transforming themselves and the world around them.

Every woman in the campaign, which can be found at reebok.com/bemorehuman, shares their own story of overcoming barriers to become their best self. Davidsdottir finds herself in the company of Gal Gadot, Danai Gurira, Gigi Hadid, Ariana Grande and Nathalie Emmanuel as they tell their stories right alongside women who’ve built organizations that are making history, like Reese Scott’s Women’s World of Boxing Gym and Shannon Kim Wager’s Women’s Strength Coalition.

“Being more human, to me, it means to be real. It means to be you,” says Davidsdottir. “It means to be the best version of you.”

“I know that it's not always going to be sunshine and rainbows, either.”

With Davidsdottir’s athletic accomplishments garnering her an Instagram following of over 1 million, she stress how important it is to her that she shows her followers the most genuine version of herself.

“I have to be real. When I have my biggest failures or go through my hardest times, I want to be able to talk about it because someone out there is going to resonate with that and someone might be going through the same thing.”

She credits her experiences as an athlete with helping her come into her own. They’ve humbled her, pushed her and proven to her that she is capable.

“Competing is my favorite thing in the world,” she says. “I get the chills just thinking about it.”

"I feel superhuman when I'm out on a competition floor.”

I feel superhuman when I'm out on a competition floor.

It’s in those moments – the ones where she feels superhuman – where she Davidsdottir is her most confident. She says they have helped her reach a place of self-acceptance.

“It's easy to get caught up in comparison, and that's the absolute worst. You are you, and I am me. If you're trying to be someone else, you might just end up being a lesser version of them, you know? Let them be them, and you flourish into the best you.”

“I never thought I was good enough or pretty enough or skinny enough or anything like that,” she reflects. “And now I'm able to shift that.”

“When my body feels strong and fit, I feel powerful. I feel unstoppable. I feel like I can do anything in the world.”

“Appreciate where you are and be happy with where you are, but not satisfied.”

Appreciate where you are and be happy with where you are, but not satisfied.

This hunger for self-improvement is what motivates Davidsdottir day in and day out.

“If you really want something, you can work hard for it and you can get that,” she says. “Even if you fail somewhere along the way, you're not a failure, and it's not a destination. You stand up and you keep moving. Sometimes our failures are the best thing that can happen to us along the way.”

“Resilience. It's the will to keep going when things aren't going your way,” she adds.  

Using fitness as a vehicle to discover these qualities within oneself is not something Davidsdottir sees as exclusive to elite athletes.

“Fitness can help women change the world,” she nods. “They’re going to feel empowered. They're going to feel confident in their own skin.”

“I think we need to feel powerful. That's going to help us.”

And it’s about helping the women surrounding us recognize this, too.

“Sometimes, people don't want someone else to be good because they feel threatened.”

“Help others become better and rise with them. There's room for everyone to be great.”

Help others become better and rise with them. There's room for everyone to be great.

Join the women making change at Reebok.com/bemorehuman and #bemorehuman. And, be sure to tune in and watch Davidsdottir compete in the 2018 Reebok CrossFit Games which will take place from August 1 – August 5 in Madison, Wisconsin.

CrossFit® / July 2018
Sarah Corda, Global Newsroom