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Studio / March 2017
Danielle Rines, Global Newsroom

So You Think You Can't Dance

We’ve all been there. You enter a studio dance class for the first time, look around at everyone warming up and rush to the back row.

You’re thinking, ‘What am I doing here? I can’t dance!’

But that’s where you’re wrong.

For all of those who have said they have no rhythm or their hips “just don’t move that way,” this post is for you.

Les Mills Master Trainer, Rachael Newsham, an instructor for the group dance class Sh’bam, totally understands the intimidation factor. 

“Not only are they judging themselves, they are measuring themselves against peers to rate themselves on how good or bad they are, in comparison to what they see in the mirror,” she says of the members of group classes.

Newsham’s advice to kick the dance class nerves?

“Make the decision to remove all judgement of others and yourself and take it for what it is –something new, something fun, and something you will get better only by doing it more,” she says. 

“The difference between a dancer and a non-dancer is self-belief.”

Instead of making you feel insecure about your potential “lack of moves” dance is a great way to boost your confidence.

“It’s all people of all shapes and sizes standing beside each other, covered in smiles and sweat, having the best time ever,” she says. “How can you not have confidence when you look around and people are dripping in joy, watching you dance next to them?”

Newsham says Sh’bam in particular is a class that lets you do it your way so first timers can feel safe in the studio. 

“The confidence is contagious. The environment is so supportive, for all abilities – anything goes and everything is encouraged, so no one can ever be wrong,” she says. 

So let the spotlight shine on you the next time you’re out at the club because after learning these 4 beginner Sh’bam movements you’ll own the dance floor!

 
1. Three Step Drag and Drop

Step to the left, toes turned out, shift your weight back, then step forward again, then drag the back foot to join the front foot with a little hop. Place both hands out, palms facing away.

 

2.  Hip Wiggle, Arm Push and Snap

Bend the knees, push the hip to the right, drop the right hand, now pop the hip to the left and come up, pop the hip back to the right and snap the finger. Repeat the hip wiggle left, right, left, right again.

 

Combination of Moves 1 and 2

Add moves one and two together, just don’t stop!

 

3. Walk Back and Push

Walk backwards – left, right, left, right, pushing hands out at chest height while rotating hands outwards – as if you’re waving ‘no’.

 

4. Walk Forward and Shoulder Hand Swag

Walk forwards – left, right, left, right, with palms facing down, straight arms, wrist to hip, rotate hands outwards as if you’re waving ‘no’, and swing the shoulders outwards as you walk.

 

Full Routine

These are great moves for new dancers because they involve walking and grooving – “groove” meaning a total body movement, where your whole body absorbs the beat your way.

Have you tried these @LesMills moves? Tweet @ReebokWomen and show us!

Studio / March 2017
Danielle Rines, Global Newsroom
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